Notice of Furnishing

posted by Michael Fortney  |  Jan 5, 2010 9:40 PM in Construction Law

Potential lien claimants may be required to prepare and provide to 1) the owner, through its designee as noted on the Notice of Commencement, and 2) the original contractor a notice of furnishing in order to protect their lien rights.  The Notice of Furnishing must be served within 21 days of the first supply of labor or materials to the project.  R.C. 1311.05(A).

The Notice of Furnishing must contain the following information:  

(a) the name of the owner or the owner's designee; 

(b) the name and address of the original contractor under which the claimant is performing work or supplying materials; 

(c) the name and address of the contractor the claimant has a contract with; 

(d) a reasonable identification of the property;

(e) the date the labor or supplies were first provided; and 

(f) the name and address of the claimant.  

The Notice of Furnishing goes back 21 days only, to protect any labor or supplies provided 21 days before the service of the Notice of Furnishing forward.  Failure to serve the Notice of Furnishing, when required, results in forfeiture of lien rights.

If a lien claimant is late to serve the Notice of Furnishing, but it is still working or has worked within the last 21 days, it can stile file a Notice of Furnishing.  All work performed from 21 days before the service of the Notice of Furnishing forward will be protected.

If a lien claimant fails to file a Notice of Furnishing and its work is done and it is still within the time period for filing a lien, the claimant may make a formal request for a Notice of Commencement from the owner, by certified mail.  If the owner does not respond within 10 days after receipt, the requirement to serve the Notice of Furnishing may be excused.  R.C. 1311.04(J).

We hope you enjoy the photos on this page and find them interesting. The photos were taken by Peter Gostelow during a bicycle tour while in Tibet. You can see more of Peter's photos at www.petergostelow.com.

Contact Us

Michael Fortney Neil Klingshirn Joseph Spoonster
Michael Fortney
Construction Law, Employment and Labor Law, Business Law, Litigation, Arbitration

Articles

Employers Face Risks When Classifying Employees As Exempt The 6th Circuit recently held that an employee of Belle Tire with an "executive" job description was not auto ...
Facebook Posts by Employees Can Go Too Far and Lose Concerted Activity Protection While some Facebook posts by employees are protected as concerted activity under the National Labor Relations Act, Face ...
Arbitrator's Remedy Must Not be Contrary to Established Law When an arbitrator awards a remedy that is contrary to established law and contrary to the remedy provided in the agree ...
Employers Must Submit BWC Settlement Claims by October 22, 2014 Group-rated employers who received a settlement claim form from the San Allen Inc. v. Bureau of Worker's Compensati ...
Facebook "Like"s May Be Protected Employment Activity "Like"ing a Facebook post may be a protected concerted activity under federal labor law, meaning an employer ...